Preparation for Rally 13 Track Event, Thread 1


Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,512
Greenwood, IN
For those bringing their GT’s to the Rally 13 track day, much of what I list below has been provided here on the Forum over the many Rallies we have enjoyed in the past. I have scrubbed the prose which is general in nature for a track event. There may be a few items that do not apply to our track event, but it is good general information for owners new to the track experience and a good refresher to those with experience. Reading this will give you a general idea of track terms, equipment required, car preparation, personal expectations and above all having fun driving your car in a controlled manner on a track devoid of police and intersection traffic worries.

There will be three run group divisions, Novice, Intermediate and Advanced based on your assessment of your driver skill and prior (if any) track experience. We want you to feel comfortable in the run group of your choosing knowing the other cars in your run group are piloted by drivers with similar driving skills. I will ask the Advanced drivers to partner up with Novice drivers if asked to help them understand track etiquette. The legendary Mark McGowan (as well as others) has offered to float in different run groups where needed for track instruction. We will have an early morning drivers meeting (time TBD) at the track after which we will harvest the car tech inspection sheets (which may be posted prior to the rally but will also be available from Dr. Frank prior to the drivers meeting proper). Track day outings in prior GT rallies have always been great fun for all run groups. To begin to appreciate the level of performance Ford has designed in any of the Ford GT vehicles is quite amazing. It will be safe and fun for all participants. Just remember, this is not a race!

Objectives for Beginners at a High Performance Driving Event (HPDE)

The HPDE program is designed to impart a solid foundation of knowledge to the student. The key notions taught form the basic, building blocks upon which all driving skills are developed. Students are taught safe-driving skills on an enclosed, track under an instructor's supervision. At a minimum, students will be taught the following:

* How to drive the proper “line” of the track;
* How to utilize Turn-in, Apex, and Track-out cones as landmarks for track navigation;
* Proper braking, shifting, and cornering techniques;
* Proper seating, grasping of steering wheel, use of mirrors, etc.;
* Use of your vision (ocular driving), to look ahead, behind, etc.;
* Passing zones and no-passing zones;
* Proper use of passing signals and your responsibilities in both passing a car and being passed;
* General vehicle dynamics and car control;
* The numbers and names of corners and straights of the track;
* How to pre-visualize driving a proper lap;
* Motorsport park safety and corner-worker techniques and responsibilities; and
* How to have fun and learn while meeting some very nice people.

The correct line

The safest and most efficient way around a track is known as "the line." It is also the shortest way around the course and uses the entire (emphasis here, ENTIRE) course surface from one side to the other. It is vital to know where to place the car on the line so each turn can be consistently driven safely and smoothly.

The turn-in, apex, and track-out cones are key elements in the learning process which help you master proper cornering technique. Once these skills are mastered, you should be able to find the proper line around any course in two or three laps without the need for markers. Knowing "the line" and driving it properly every lap is the key to safe, smooth driving both on the track and public streets and highways.

Basic Notions of Track Driving

ABC
Acceleration, Braking, & Cornering, the three basic elements of driving.

100%
A vehicle has only 100% tire capability. If you are using 100% of its capability for braking, you have 0% remaining for either acceleration or cornering; if you are using 80% of tire capability for cornering, you only have 20% left for acceleration and 0% for braking or 20% left for braking and 0% for acceleration. The driver must balance vehicle capability between braking, cornering and acceleration.

Steering Wheel Position
Hands should be at 9 and 3 o'clock and in contact with the wheel at all times (except when shifting).

Turn-in, Apex, Track-out Points
Use turn-in cone as a reference to begin turn, the apex cone marks where the car should be at the mid-point in the turn, and the track-out cone as the target as you unwind the turn.

Braking and Shifting
All braking and downshifting must be done in a straight line. All braking should be finished before a turn is initiated. Upshifting should be done after exiting turns with the wheels straight.

Throttle
Never lift off the throttle while in a turn; use maintenance throttle, or smoothly increase the throttle through the turn.

Use of Steering Wheel
Use smooth, firm motions to minimize wasted use of the wheel.

Downshifting
Use brakes to slow down; do not use the transmission to slow the car. Make all transitions smoothly When moving from throttle to brake, brake to throttle, entry to, or exit from a corner, all actions should be smooth and decisive. Avoid any actions that could possibly unsettle the car.

Never Coast
Either be on the throttle (even maintenance throttle) or on the brake — never coast!

Proper Cornering Sequence
Safe cornering requires a conscious and repeatable sequence of driver actions to properly enter and exit turns. This sequence must be smooth and flowing and requires regular practice to make it a habit. The sequence is as follows, assuming turn entry from a straight section of the course:

Lift
While driving in a straight line and looking ahead, smoothly lift off the throttle.

Brake
Smoothly and progressively apply the brakes in a straight line. Not all turns require use of the brakes. Squeeze and ease is the technique. Heavy braking initially modulating to lighter as the turn-in point is neared.

Downshift
Using heel-toe technique, downshift to the appropriate gear to maintain torque to provide for acceleration out of the turn. Not all turns require downshifting.

Off the Brake
While looking ahead to the apex and beyond, smoothly release the brakes when you're ready to turn in.

Breath & Turn-In
Breath all the time! Practice ocular driving. Look where you want to go. The car WILL go where you look. Never look where you are. Always look ahead to the next point by physically turning your head. Slowly and smoothly turn the wheel to initiate the turn. Let your hands follow the eyes and use progressive steering.

Accelerate
After initiating the turn, smoothly apply maintenance throttle, then progressively increase the throttle as you pass the apex and begin to track out to the track-out point.

Track-Out
As you pass the apex, smoothly and progressively open the steering wheel. Let the car unwind to the track-out point. This is not always needed. Your instructor will explain when and how.

Talk Yourself Around the Course
An excellent way to learn a track at any point in your driving career is to talk yourself through the course. This is also a good technique when you haven't driven a session as well as you might. For a corner, for example, think and visualize the following:
BREATH ALL THE TIME This keeps you relaxed and focused
* Lift off the throttle.
* On the brake.
* Downshift.
* Off the brake.
* turn in.
* On the throttle.
* Track out.

Post-Run Routine
At the end of the run group, as you slow and cool the car down from at speed, practice driving the line at cool-down speeds. Always drive the line on the track at any speed. It helps with muscle/sight memory. Review the session with your instructor. Identify areas and skills with which you feel comfortable as well as turns and skills you need to improve.

Your goal is to have the course memorized turn by turn, in order of occurrence.

Use the course map to relive the session and talk yourself through each turn over and over. Lift, brake, downshift, off the brake, breath and turn in, on the throttle, track out. Visualize every turn in order and include any improvements needed. Visualize and memorize one perfect lap after another. Recognize mistakes but do not dwell on them. Always end by visualizing a perfect lap.

Getting Ready
You need to get your car ready ahead of time. It needs to be inspected. Fix anything that requires attention. It is important that you start this process well in advance of the event. Do not leave this process until the last few days before the event. What if you need something repaired on your car? You won't have time to get it done. Don't set yourself up for this increased stress. A few things to think about:

* When was the last time the brake fluid was flushed?
* Do the brake pads have at least 1/2 or more wear left in them?
* Does everything work?
* Do the tires have tread to meet the event rules?
* Is everything in proper working order?

Now go to second thread PREP FOR RALLY 13 TRACK EVENT
 
Last edited:

Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,512
Greenwood, IN
NOTE: This is not my preferred method of posting this information. The Forum has a thread posting limitation of 10,000 characters which I have exceeded in this treatise. Therefore I have had to break it into 3 separate threads. Again, not to my liking. If you want to comment on the topic, I ask that all comments be made in the 1st thread eliminating the need to read multiple comments in Chapters 2 and 3. Thanks!


For those bringing their GT’s to the Rally 13 track day, much of what I list below has been provided here on the Forum over the many Rallies we have enjoyed in the past. I have scrubbed the prose which is general in nature for a track event. There may be a few items that do not apply to our track event, but it is good general information for owners new to the track experience and a good refresher to those with experience. Reading this will give you a general idea of track terms, equipment required, car preparation, personal expectations and above all having fun driving your car in a controlled manner on a track devoid of police and intersection traffic worries.

There will be three run group divisions, Novice, Intermediate and Advanced based on your assessment of your driver skill and prior (if any) track experience. We want you to feel comfortable in the run group of your choosing knowing the other cars in your run group are piloted by drivers with similar driving skills. I will ask the Advanced drivers to partner up with Novice drivers if asked to help them understand track etiquette. The legendary Mark McGowan (as well as others) has offered to float in different run groups where needed for track instruction. We will have an early morning drivers meeting (time TBD) at the track after which we will harvest the car tech inspection sheets (which may be posted prior to the rally but will also be available from Dr. Frank prior to the drivers meeting proper). Track day outings in prior GT rallies have always been great fun for all run groups. To begin to appreciate the level of performance Ford has designed in any of the Ford GT vehicles is quite amazing. It will be safe and fun for all participants. Just remember, this is not a race!

Objectives for Beginners at a High Performance Driving Event (HPDE)

The HPDE program is designed to impart a solid foundation of knowledge to the student. The key notions taught form the basic, building blocks upon which all driving skills are developed. Students are taught safe-driving skills on an enclosed, track under an instructor's supervision. At a minimum, students will be taught the following:

* How to drive the proper “line” of the track;
* How to utilize Turn-in, Apex, and Track-out cones as landmarks for track navigation;
* Proper braking, shifting, and cornering techniques;
* Proper seating, grasping of steering wheel, use of mirrors, etc.;
* Use of your vision (ocular driving), to look ahead, behind, etc.;
* Passing zones and no-passing zones;
* Proper use of passing signals and your responsibilities in both passing a car and being passed;
* General vehicle dynamics and car control;
* The numbers and names of corners and straights of the track;
* How to pre-visualize driving a proper lap;
* Motorsport park safety and corner-worker techniques and responsibilities; and
* How to have fun and learn while meeting some very nice people.

The correct line

The safest and most efficient way around a track is known as "the line." It is also the shortest way around the course and uses the entire (emphasis here, ENTIRE) course surface from one side to the other. It is vital to know where to place the car on the line so each turn can be consistently driven safely and smoothly.

The turn-in, apex, and track-out cones are key elements in the learning process which help you master proper cornering technique. Once these skills are mastered, you should be able to find the proper line around any course in two or three laps without the need for markers. Knowing "the line" and driving it properly every lap is the key to safe, smooth driving both on the track and public streets and highways.

Basic Notions of Track Driving

ABC
Acceleration, Braking, & Cornering, the three basic elements of driving.

100%
A vehicle has only 100% tire capability. If you are using 100% of its capability for braking, you have 0% remaining for either acceleration or cornering; if you are using 80% of tire capability for cornering, you only have 20% left for acceleration and 0% for braking or 20% left for braking and 0% for acceleration. The driver must balance vehicle capability between braking, cornering and acceleration.

Steering Wheel Position
Hands should be at 9 and 3 o'clock and in contact with the wheel at all times (except when shifting).

Turn-in, Apex, Track-out Points
Use turn-in cone as a reference to begin turn, the apex cone marks where the car should be at the mid-point in the turn, and the track-out cone as the target as you unwind the turn.

Braking and Shifting
All braking and downshifting must be done in a straight line. All braking should be finished before a turn is initiated. Upshifting should be done after exiting turns with the wheels straight.

Throttle
Never lift off the throttle while in a turn; use maintenance throttle, or smoothly increase the throttle through the turn.

Use of Steering Wheel
Use smooth, firm motions to minimize wasted use of the wheel.

Downshifting
Use brakes to slow down; do not use the transmission to slow the car. Make all transitions smoothly When moving from throttle to brake, brake to throttle, entry to, or exit from a corner, all actions should be smooth and decisive. Avoid any actions that could possibly unsettle the car.

Never Coast
Either be on the throttle (even maintenance throttle) or on the brake — never coast!

Proper Cornering Sequence
Safe cornering requires a conscious and repeatable sequence of driver actions to properly enter and exit turns. This sequence must be smooth and flowing and requires regular practice to make it a habit. The sequence is as follows, assuming turn entry from a straight section of the course:

Lift
While driving in a straight line and looking ahead, smoothly lift off the throttle.

Brake
Smoothly and progressively apply the brakes in a straight line. Not all turns require use of the brakes. Squeeze and ease is the technique. Heavy braking initially modulating to lighter as the turn-in point is neared.

Downshift
Using heel-toe technique, downshift to the appropriate gear to maintain torque to provide for acceleration out of the turn. Not all turns require downshifting.

Off the Brake
While looking ahead to the apex and beyond, smoothly release the brakes when you're ready to turn in.

Breath & Turn-In
Breath all the time! Practice ocular driving. Look where you want to go. The car WILL go where you look. Never look where you are. Always look ahead to the next point by physically turning your head. Slowly and smoothly turn the wheel to initiate the turn. Let your hands follow the eyes and use progressive steering.

Accelerate
After initiating the turn, smoothly apply maintenance throttle, then progressively increase the throttle as you pass the apex and begin to track out to the track-out point.

Track-Out
As you pass the apex, smoothly and progressively open the steering wheel. Let the car unwind to the track-out point. This is not always needed. Your instructor will explain when and how.

Talk Yourself Around the Course
An excellent way to learn a track at any point in your driving career is to talk yourself through the course. This is also a good technique when you haven't driven a session as well as you might. For a corner, for example, think and visualize the following:
BREATH ALL THE TIME This keeps you relaxed and focused
* Lift off the throttle.
* On the brake.
* Downshift.
* Off the brake.
* turn in.
* On the throttle.
* Track out.

Post-Run Routine
At the end of the run group, as you slow and cool the car down from at speed, practice driving the line at cool-down speeds. Always drive the line on the track at any speed. It helps with muscle/sight memory. Review the session with your instructor. Identify areas and skills with which you feel comfortable as well as turns and skills you need to improve.

Your goal is to have the course memorized turn by turn, in order of occurrence.

Use the course map to relive the session and talk yourself through each turn over and over. Lift, brake, downshift, off the brake, breath and turn in, on the throttle, track out. Visualize every turn in order and include any improvements needed. Visualize and memorize one perfect lap after another. Recognize mistakes but do not dwell on them. Always end by visualizing a perfect lap.

Getting Ready
You need to get your car ready ahead of time. It needs to be inspected. Fix anything that requires attention. It is important that you start this process well in advance of the event. Do not leave this process until the last few days before the event. What if you need something repaired on your car? You won't have time to get it done. Don't set yourself up for this increased stress. A few things to think about:

* When was the last time the brake fluid was flushed?
* Do the brake pads have at least 1/2 or more wear left in them?
* Does everything work?
* Do the tires have tread to meet the event rules?
* Is everything in proper working order?

Now go to second thread PREP FOR RALLY 13 TRACK EVENT
 

Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,512
Greenwood, IN
The Line
The line is a physical line of movement that a car takes through any given turn. A line can be good, bad, right or wrong. The right line around a track is generally the one which gets you around the safest and fastest. In driver's education however, it is not always the fastest line which is taught. Because of the emphasis on safety, in many instances the line taught involves late apexing corners which provides greater safety and allows a greater margin for error.

Slip Angle
Slip angle is the angle between the wheel rim and the tire tread or more generally, the angle between where the car is headed vs. where the wheels are pointed. A slip angle occurs during cornering when tires are subjected to side forces. The greater the slip angle, the more there is a tendency for the tires to slide.

Oversteer
In general, used to describe the situation where the rear end of a car gets loose (in other words the rear tires lose grip) and the rear end wants to come around. More specifically, it occurs when the rear tires have a greater slip angle than the front tires. The result of oversteer is that the nose of the car is pointed toward the inside of a turn which can have the result of decreasing the radius of the turn. For this reason some (advanced) drivers induce oversteer.

Understeer
Understeer occurs when you turn the car into a corner and it still has a tendency to go straight. Also referred to as pushing or plowing. In this situation the front tires have a greater slip angle than the rear which means that the rear tires have better grip or traction than the front. Understeering will increase the radius of a turn. Most street cars are set up with a bias toward understeering.

Heel and Toe
With modern pedals, this is often misleading to new students. Also called heel and toe downshifting or double clutching, this technique is used when approaching a corner, because it allows the driver to brake and downshift at the same time which is the smoothest way to accomplish the brake-and-downshift process.

The technique involves using the ball of your right foot which is completing the braking process while rolling over the side of your foot (or in a few cases, using your heel) to blip the throttle (which raises the engine RPMs) to match the speed of the wheels in the lower gear. While your right foot is doing the above, your left foot (at an appropriate point in the braking zone) is pushing in the clutch, your right hand has taken the car out of gear, paused in neutral while your blipping the throttle and when the engine RPMs have reached the appropriate level you move into the lower gear and release the clutch.

Some drivers let the clutch out after moving into neutral and then push it in again to move into the lower gear, hence the term "double-clutch." There is no reference here to "appropriate level"; while each gear certainly does have its own appropriate RPM range, depending on which lower gear you're changing to, most drivers are not watching their tachometers at this time but are relying on sound and feel.

That is why this technique is employed by more advanced drivers; it takes a certain amount of seat time in order to develop the sense of when to release the clutch just by the sound of the engine and feel of the car. This is a technique that is better practiced in a large parking lot or quiet back road until it feels natural before attempting it on the track. Or you can just purchase the electronic “auto-blip” which does the whole process electronically.

Smoothness
How many times have you heard an instructor talk about being smooth? Frequently! Smoothness is attained by keeping the car well-balanced at all times. What does that mean? Optimally, it means having the car's weight equally distributed on all four wheels. If the car's weight is evenly distributed on all four wheels, it means you will be able to maximize the traction (or adhesion) of all four tires. And, the more rubber you have in contact with the road, the better you are able to control the car, not to mention the faster you will be able to go or stop the car. One of the first upgrades new HPDE students make is to exchange their street tires for softer compound tires. These tires have less tread, softer compound rubber and, therefore, more tire is in contact with the road surface. This enables greater adhesion and hence more safety at speed.

Weight Transfer
Unless you are traveling in a straight line, and very rarely even then, is the car's weight evenly distributed on all four tires. The car's weight is constantly being shifted from side to side, frontwards and backwards and even up and down. Your goal as the driver is to manage these weight shifts or transfers which occur while braking, shifting, cornering and accelerating in order to take advantage of every bit of traction that is available. By the way, there is a limit as to the amount of traction your car has available. This is commonly defined through the conceptual use of the Friction Circle.

Think of the Friction Circle in these terms: a tire cannot exceed 100% of any one function or combination of functions at any given time. If, for example, you use all the traction available (100%) to brake in a straight line, you will not have any percentage left over for turning. If you need to turn while braking, you have to reduce the percentage used for braking in order to have some left over for turning. 100% adhesion is not available in two directions at once!

Seeing an example of a tire contact patch is a great way to show the effects of weight transfer on your car. In reality, a tire's contact patch is about the size of a standard postcard; this is the amount of rubber in contact with the road surface. These tire contact patches expand (when weight is over that wheel) or contract (when weight has been shifted away from that wheel).

When accelerating (in a straight line) weight transfers to the rear wheels, expanding the rear wheels tire contact patch but decreasing the front wheels tire contact patch. The reverse happens under braking. Add a corner and lateral weight transfer takes place. Turn to the right, and the weight shifts to the left; turn to the left, and the weight shifts to the right.

Assuming you have just finished braking or lifting, during the entrance to a right hand turn, the largest tire contact patch is at the left front tire with the left rear tire patch being almost as large.

String Theory
Imagine a string with one end attached to the bottom center of your steering wheel when it is in a neutral (straight) position and the other secured to your accelerator in the depressed position. When you turn your wheel, it forces the accelerator to ease up. As the wheel straightens out, you are able to fully depress the accelerator. There is a balance between accelerating and turning. that adds up to the 100% discussed above under weight transfer.

Similarly, imagine the string attached to the brake pedal instead. The same principle applies. In short, you cannot turn the wheel without giving up some acceleration or braking power.

This is the practice of braking at the limit of tire adhesion while still keeping control of the car and not locking up the wheels. Start by very gradually braking later and later as you approach a corner. This allows you to learn what your particular tires' adhesion limits are without adding the effects of lateral weight transfer. As you gain more experience you will want to try trail-braking.

Trail-braking
This is the practice of braking and cornering at the same time. As a beginning student, however, you are taught to brake in a straight line. Trail-braking allows you to maintain your straightaway speed longer before having to brake for a corner because you can corner and brake simultaneously. You still begin your major braking on the approach to a corner which means that you have transferred weight to the two front tires and enlarging your front contact patches.

To maintain that extra adhesion in order to give yourself added steering capability, you continue to brake, but not as hard as you did at the beginning. This frees up some of that 100% of your tire, allowing you to apply the remainder of the 100% to your steering. Just as you apex, you can "unwind" the steering wheel for the exit, thus straightening out your tires and lessening the need to steer. You have also freed up some of that 100% that you can now apply to the throttle. The straighter the wheel, the more throttle you may apply which transfers more weight to the rear wheels. It is this greater adhesion in the rear that is needed for accelerating out of the corner.

Trailing Throttle Oversteer
We have explained oversteer as a situation where the rear wheels lose traction in a corner. The rear wheels can lose traction in a corner if you lift off the accelerator, transferring weight to the front tires and off of the rear ones. Therefore, the rear of the car becomes light and because of the cornering forces the rear end swings to the outside of the corner.

Experienced drivers in certain situations will actually induce oversteer, maybe not by lifting entirely off the accelerator but by trailing or by slightly coming off the gas enough to swing the rear of the car around the corner.

Depending on the type of corner in which this technique is used, it may be the fastest way through the corner, as long as you remember smoothness. The weight transfer that is constantly taking place during the transition between braking and accelerating increases the need for smoothness. Abrupt changes in weight transfer will upset the balance of the car and you may end up without traction when you need it the most! Very undesirable. That is why smoothness is emphasized so strongly at High Performance Driver Education Events.

IN ALL, HAVE FUN AND BE SAFE!
 
Last edited:

PL510*Jeff

Well-known member
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Nov 3, 2005
4,752
Renton, Washington
Mr. Bill I didn't memorize your missive. However I find this missing---

1) HAVE FUN !

2) BE SAFE !

3)
DRIVE WITHIN YOUR LIMITS !


Finish line 🏁 first round is on Dr. Frank if you do all three !
 

Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,512
Greenwood, IN
Mr. Bill I didn't memorize your missive. However I find this missing---

1) HAVE FUN !

2) BE SAFE !

3) DRIVE WITHIN YOUR LIMITS !

Finish line 🏁 first round is on Dr. Frank if you do all three !
Jeff, you are correct and will be echoed at the drivers meeting.
Drive within your limits..... is certainly something to be remembered while out on the track :D
 

Magic

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Mar 13, 2010
740
Fredericksburg, TX
Is Biginch Blake providing "track-side" vacuuming services like he did at Rally 7 or do I need to bring my own?
 

Specracer

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Nov 28, 2005
6,774
MA
Anyone got a video of someone fast running the configuration we are using?
 

BtwoG

GT Owner
Dec 8, 2013
983
Atlanta, GA
All,
If you are not familiar with Ross Bentley, he has a number of really good books in his Speed Secrets series. He also has a number of free ebooks and just came out with The HPDE 1st Timer's Guide.

One of the hardest things for me when I started doing HPDEs was learning the tracks. Ross has an ebook for How to Learn a Track Fast.

All the free ebooks can be found at https://speedsecrets.com/ebooks/
Bill
 

PL510*Jeff

Well-known member
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Nov 3, 2005
4,752
Renton, Washington
Ross has some very good racing, driving, mental focus books. btw he and Don Kitch (instructor in Racing in the Rain movie) were on the development team new Garmin in car track video system, which in my opinion is now the best. Learns the track and your driving style and offers great tips in real time on improving your lap times. A good you tube video, shot in England a couple of months ago, shows a driver (who had never been on a track prior) the fastest way around the track. In about 15 minutes he lowered his lap times from 4:00 down to 2:30. I would suggest reviewing both before the Rally for driving improvements. Both Ross and Don are friends. I hope to have the Garmin in time for the Rally.
 
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PeteK

GT Owner
Apr 18, 2014
1,624
Kalama, Free part of WA State
Then I’ll save the cash and follow your line!
 
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dreimer

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Feb 8, 2018
109
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
Then I’ll save the cash and follow your line!
This reminds me of my first off track excursion. PCA HPDE event in my 1988 stock 911 non-turbo. I had overtaken a new(ish) 911 Turbo 4S and was feeling full of myself. He re-passed me. Fair enough. I was staying really close hoping to keep momentum and maybe get good exit speed on a corner before a short straight and maybe re-pass (and wait for him to pass me back on the long straight). I followed him through the corner, but got into the marbles, and lost it. Lots of run-off room, so no problem. (Besides embarrassment.)

After the session he came over to talk to me. Nice older man with a thick German accent. Reminded me of my grandfather. He looks at me and says "I saw you in my mirror and I knew your were going to go off. You were following my line. My line is my line. It is not your line. I have a 911 Turbo S and you do not!"

That statement sticks in my head every time I'm on the track now. He probably has no idea how valuable that lesson he taught me was.
 
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PL510*Jeff

Well-known member
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Nov 3, 2005
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Renton, Washington
Then I’ll save the cash and follow your line!
You would be better off following Mark-Andy-Ron
 

PeteK

GT Owner
Apr 18, 2014
1,624
Kalama, Free part of WA State
Them too.
 

texas mongrel

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Houston Texas
One year at Big Bend’s Open Road Race I was in my 06 and Donny Mac was in his. I asked him how he was going to time his run (you have a target time to aim for) and he said “i’m just going to follow you!” And that’s exactly what he did!
 

Sinovac

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Jul 18, 2006
5,750
Largo, Florida
I’m going on the record that my son and I are novices, we will be driving 2 GTs in the novice group, and we will be driving slow. Stay away from us. 😂
 
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fjpikul

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Belleville, IL
You should make a widow sign that says "Lawyer Driving." I am quite sure that will suffice.
 

Sinovac

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You should make a widow sign that says "Lawyer Driving." I am quite sure that will suffice.
I’ll bring a summons with me just in case.
 

fjpikul

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Good one.
 

BM SoCal

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Orange County, CA
I seem to remember seeing service and tuning availability at past rallies. Will someone be doing work at this one?
 

fjpikul

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10,731
Belleville, IL
I doubt it. Rich and Dennis used to bring some tools, but Rich now comes to enjoy himself.
 
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spartan

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Feb 11, 2017
1,153
Bloomfield Hills MI
Prepping for the rally! Joe from Pat Milliken is doing an oil change on a Sunday in my garage. Talk about service.

Thanks Joe

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