Preparation for Rally 13 Track Event, Thread 1


roketman

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Oct 24, 2005
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ma.
Thought I’d share this old post I made some years back. Hope this is helpful
Wish I could be there! Hopefully in 2022!

Objectives for Beginning DE Participants

The DE program is designed to impart a solid foundation of knowledge to the student. The key notions taught form the basic, building blocks upon which all driving skills are developed. Students are taught safe-driving skills on an enclosed, track under an instructor's supervision. At a minimum, students will be taught the following:

* How to drive the proper line of the track;
* How to utilize Turn-in, Apex, and Track-out cones as landmarks for navigation;
* Proper braking, shifting, and cornering techniques;
* Proper seating, grasping of steering wheel, use of mirrors, etc.;
* Use of your vision (ocular driving), to look ahead, behind, etc.;
* Passing zones and no-passing zones;
* Proper use of passing signals and your responsibilities in both passing a car and being passed;
* General vehicle dynamics and car control;
* The numbers and names of corners and straights of the track;
* How to pre-visualize driving a proper lap;
* Motorsport park safety and corner-worker techniques and sponsibilities; and
* How to have fun and learn while meeting some very nice people.

The correct line

The safest and most efficient way around a track is known as "the line." It is also the shortest way around the course and uses the entire course surface from one side to the other. It is vital to know where to place the car on the line so each turn can be consistently driven safely and smoothl

The turn-in, apex, and track-out cones are key elements in the learning process which help you master proper cornering technique. Once these skills are mastered, you should be able to find the proper line around any course in two or three laps without the need for markers. Knowing "the line" and driving it properly every lap is the key to safe, smooth driving both on the track and public streets and highways.

Basic Notions of Track Driving

ABC
Acceleration, Braking, & Cornering, the three basic elements of driving.

100%
A vehicle has only 100% capability. If you are using 100% of its capability for braking, you have 0% left over for either acceleration or cornering; if you are using 80% of its capability for cornering, you only have 20% left for acceleration and 0% for braking or 20% left for braking and 0% for acceleration.

Steering Wheel Position
Hands should be at 9 and 3 o'clock and in contact with the wheel at all times (except when shifting).

Turn-in, Apex, Track-out Points
Use turn-in cone as a reference to begin turn, the apex cone marks where the car should be at the mid-point in the turn, and the track-out cone as the target as you unwind the turn.

Braking and Shifting
All braking and downshifting must be done in a straight line. All braking should be finished be-fore a turn is initiated. Upshifting should be done after exiting turns with the wheels straight.

Throttle
Never lift off the throttle while in a turn; use maintenance throttle, or smoothly increase the throttle through the turn.

Use of Steering Wheel
Use smooth, firm motions to minimize wasted use of the wheel.

Downshifting
Use brakes to slow down; do not use the transmission to slow the car. Make all transitions smoothly When moving from throttle to brake, brake to throttle, entry to, or exit from a corner, all ac-tions should be smooth and decisive. Avoid any actions that could possibly unsettle the car.

Never Coast
Either be on the throttle (even maintenance throttle) or on the brake — never coast!

Proper Cornering Sequence
Safe cornering requires a conscious and repeatable sequence of driver actions to properly enter and exit turns. This sequence must be smooth and flowing and requires regular practice to make it a habit. The sequence is as follows, assuming turn entry from a straight section of the course:

Lift
While driving in a straight line and looking ahead, smoothly lift off the throttle.

Brake
Smoothly and progressively apply the brakes in a straight line. Not all turns require use of the brakes.Squeeze and ease is the technique

Downshift
Using heel-toe technique, downshift to the appropriate gear to maintain torque to provide for acceleration out of the turn. Not all turns require downshifting.

Off the Brake
While looking ahead to the apex and beyond, smoothly release the brakes when you're ready to turn in.
Breath & Turn-In
breath all the time ! Practice ocular driving.Look where you want to go.Never look where you are. Always look ahead to the next point by physically turning your head. Slowly and smoothly turn the wheel to initiate the turn. Let your hands follow the eyes and use progressive steering.

Accelerate
After initiating the turn, smoothly apply maintenance throttle, then progressively increase the throttle as you pass the apex and begin to track out to the track-out point.

Track-Out
As you pass the apex, smoothly and progressively open the steering wheel. Let the car unwind to the track-out point. This is not always needed. Your instructor will explain when and how.
Talk Yourself Around the Course

An excellent way to learn a track at any point in your driving career is to talk yourself through the course. This is also a good technique when you haven't driven a session as well as you might. For a corner, for example, think and visualize the following:
BREATH ALL THE TIME This keeps you relaxed and focused
* Lift off the throttle.
* On the brake.
* Downshift.
* Off the brake.
* turn in.
* On the throttle.
* Track out.

Post-Run Routine

At the end of the run group, as you slowly and safely turn to the paddock, review the session with your instructor. Identify areas and skills with which you feel comfortable as well as turns and skills you need to improve.

Be absolutely sure you have the course memorized turn by turn, in order.

Use the course map to relive the session and talk yourself through each turn over and over. Lift, brake, downshift, off the brake, breath and turn in, on the throttle, track out. Visualize every turn in order and include any improvements needed. Visualize and memorize one perfect lap after another. Recognize mistakes but do not dwell on them. Always end by visualizing a perfect lap.
Getting Ready

You need to get your car ready ahead of time. It needs to be inspected Fix anything that requires attention. It is important that you start this process well in advance of the event. Do not leave this process until the last few days before the event. What if you need something repaired on your car? You won't have time to get it done. Don't set yourself up to have stress increased. A few things to think about:

* When was the last time the brake fluid was flushed?
* Do the brake pads have at least 1/2 or more wear left in them?
* Does everything work?
* Do the tires have tread to meet the event rules?
* Is everything in proper working order?

Get this inspection out of the way early and freshen up the car as needed. Then you will feel that everything is in working order.

Do you have a helmet? Seems strange to ask that. But often this is overlooked until the last minute. Get a good helmet such as Shoei, Bell, or Simpson. Don't buy a used helmet. It may have been dropped (this can permanently damage them). Who knows what's happened to it. Helmets must fit properly. There are guides for measuring your head to assure proper fitment. If you are buying a new helmet now, check out our tech requirements.

Look at a video of the track. You can obtain driver education videos of what it looks like to drive around the track you are going to. Ask a friend. Chances are they have one you can borrow. This will help you know what things are going to look like ahead of time. This takes away the mystery and reduces information overload that first day at the track.
Packing for the Event

So, your car is all inspected and is A-OK. You have your helmet and have completed all the necessary forms. You even looked on a map to see how to get to the track more than one day in advance. (Don't laugh.) Now, what should I bring with me so I am prepared? On the one hand you don't want to bring everything in the garage. On the other hand, it would be nice to have what you really need.

First and foremost — pack a friend! What you say? Pack a friend? Yup. Basically, everything will go much better if you know someone else who is doing this and you can hook up with them beforehand. They will be thrilled to do it. Really! Trust me on this one. They really will want to help. Someone helped them their first time and they still remember it. Ask them what they bring with them, how they prepare their cars.
Pack Early

Don't make the mistake that I have by leaving the packing until the morning of the event. Pack the day before. Try not to pack the night before because before you know it it's 1:00am in the morning and you are supposed to leave for the track at 5:30 am. Been there. Done that.

So, what to bring with you? Here are some thoughts:

For Your Car

* Paper towels and window cleaner
* Tire air pressure gauge
* Wrench to tighten wheel lug nuts, preferrably a torque wrench. By the way, those "soft sockets" which you use not to mar the finish on the alloy lug nuts will melt, literally, if you attempt to loosen/tighten lugs after having been on the track. Also, if you use a steel socket it won't melt. However, it will break off the alloy lugs nuts on the first turn. Then you will have your wheel stuck on your car. The broken lug can be removed without damaging the wheel. But it is major surgery. So, if you have alloy lug nuts on your car then let the cool completely before attempting to loosen them. Or, you can put on open-ended steel lugs and have no problem. This is what most people do. You can purchase these through aftermarket Porsche suppliers.
* Your car tool kit, jack, etc.
* A cotton towel or two
* White shoe polish in "wipe-on bottle" or thin duck tape for car numbers. You were assigned a car number when you applied for the event.
* Gasoline! It sounds funny; but make sure you car has a full tank of gas when you arrive a the track. I will admit publicly that I almost ran out of gas on the track at my first event!
* One or two quarts of oil
* Optional: Racer's tape or duct tape to cover headlights
* Optional: 12v air pump (Someone will probably have one at the track or the track will have an air pump in case you need air.)
* A canvas bag or duffle bag or milk crate or box, etc. to hold all this stuff

For You

* Completed Tech Inspection Form
* Directions to the track
* driver's license
* Copies of the Event Schedule, Track Map printed from the website
* Money!!
* Helmet
* Your watch
* Hat
* Sunscreen
* Umbrella (not red or yellow)
* Rain coat or jacket you could wear in the rain (not red or yellow). Always bring this. You will be glad you did when that summer thunderstorm comes through on what was otherwise supposed to be a sunny day.
* Long-sleeve cotton shirts (required if you're driving, no matter what the weather)
* T-shirt, sweatshirt, etc. as the weather demands
* Long cotton pants (like blue jeans required if you're driving)
* Tennis shoes (not jogging shoes with their big, wide bulky soles)
* Small cooler with ice, and plenty of drinks. Drink lots while at the track. You don't want to get dehydrated. Adrenaline, sun, exercise, etc. All this excitement makes you need fluids. Don't leave home without them.
* Light lunch. There may be someplace to get lunch at the track. Some have it. Some don't. Know this ahead of time!
* Optional: A tarp to put over your stuff in case it rains
* Optional: A small folding chair
* A canvas bag or duffle bag or milk crate or box, etc. to hold all this stuff

Finally, don't forget to leave your ego at home. You're there to be safe and to learn, not to impress anyone.
When You Arrive

Get there early. Talk to people. Find out what's going on. You will need to do the following:

Sign in — You will be required to sign an insurance waiver for the track and for the FGT forum. Remember to collect all the forms they have for you. This will probably include the schedule for your run groups.

Park — Find a place to park your car which is not in the way of everything.

Empty your car — Take everything out of your car. This means everything! Empty the glove compartment, the trunk or trunks, the door pockets, remove the radar detector, the cellphone. (If it's permanently installed turn it off! Yes, someone's did ring while driving around the track at speed!). Remove the floor mats. Remove the coke cans and empty coffee cups from underneath the seat.

Get in line for Tech Inspection — There will be a final tech inspection of your car and equipment. This is usually near pit lane. Bring your car, your helmet, your completed Tech Inspection Form and get in line. Get there early! Remember to have your car numbers put on your car before you get into line. When you received your application back for the event you were assigned a car number. Did you notice what it was!? Put the car numbers on with either white shoe polish or thin duct tape. I prefer the thin duct tape on the rear side windows since it doesn't wash off if/when it rains. Put the numbers on both sides of the car as well as on the front.

Get set for the driver's meeting — There will be a driver's meeting prior to the event. This will take place after all the cars are inspected. Make sure your car is all set, your equipment is all set, and you are all set. Relax. Go to the driver's meeting and pay attention. Don't be late. They will tell you about the track, any special considerations, how the flags are to be used, etc.

Meet your instructor — You will be assigned an instructor. You will probably be introduced to him/her at the driver's meeting. Get to know this person. Find out where they are parked.

Novice meeting — Usually, beginners and novices attend a classroom session prior to driving. You will be told about this at the driver's meeting. Ask questions!

Get in line — Make sure you know when your group starts. Go to the bathroom (really). Get to the grid on time. Make sure your instructor finds you or you find him/her. Arrange where/when to meet ahead of time. Have fun.

Bring stuff to drink, your hat, jacket, etc. ) course at my first event, a brilliant sunny summer day, I left my windows open and it rained in my car. Of course I had taken my keys with me so no one could close it for me, even though many people looked in the car to see if they could! Some nice soul finally put a tarp over the drivers window! Keys. Many people just leave their keys in their car while parked for eventualities such as this. I won't tell you to leave your keys in your car. It's probably all right though. But it's your choice. Sometimes I take mine. Sometimes I don't.

Well, that's enough to get you thinking about what to bring. I hope this helps and doesn't cause your trunk to fill up with too much junk.OH ya What trunk !! But don't worry. If you forget something, there's always one of those "over the top" people who trailer their cars at the event. They bring all sorts of junk with them. They love to lend it to you because they feel so guilty for bringing too much useless hardware that they never use. (Been there. Still doing it.) So, don't feel shy about asking to borrow something! Most of all have fun, be safe, and learn what FORD GT"s are really like...
HAVE FUN !!
ITS A BLAST!n
Driving Terminology

Most of these terms are heard frequently around the track — some in our novice meetings held before each Driver Education event — while others are used by instructors in the process of teaching.


Apex
Every corner has three parts to it; the entry, apex and exit. The apex represents the transition point between the entrance and exit of a corner. Physically, it is the point during the turn where your inside front wheel is closest to the inside edge of the corner. You can early apex, late apex, or correctly apex a turn. The correct apex to a turn is where the car is in its most stable condition. It is at this point where you will be able to get the maximum acceleration out of a corner.

The Line
The line is a physical line of movement that a car takes through any given turn. A line can be good, bad, right or wrong. The right line around a track is generally the one which gets you around the safest and fastest. In driver's education however, it is not always the fastest line which is taught. Because of the emphasis on safety, in many instances the line taught involves late apexing corners which provides greater safety and allows a greater margin for error.

Slip Angle
Slip angle is the angle between the wheel rim and the tire tread or more generally, the angle between where the car is headed vs. where the wheels are pointed. A slip angle occurs during cornering when tires are subjected to side forces. The greater the slip angle, the more there is a tendency for the tires to slide.

Oversteer
In general, used to describe the situation where the rear end of a car gets loose (in other words the rear tires lose grip) and the rear end wants to come around. More specifically, it occurs when the rear tires have a greater slip angle than the front tires. The result of oversteer is that the nose of the car is pointed toward the inside of a turn which can have the result of decreasing the radius of the turn. For this reason some (advanced) drivers induce oversteer.

Understeer
Understeer occurs when you turn the car into a corner and it still has a tendency to go straight. Also referred to as pushing or plowing. In this situation the front tires have a greater slip angle than the rear which means that the rear tires have better grip or traction than the front. Understeering will increase the radius of a turn. Most street cars are set up with a bias toward understeering.

Heel and Toe
With modern pedals, this is often misleading to new students. Also called heel and toe downshifting or double clutching, this technique is used when approaching a corner, because it allows the driver to brake and downshift at the same time which is the smoothest way to accomplish the brake-and-downshift process.

The technique involves using the ball of your right foot which is completing the braking process while rolling over the side of your foot (or in a few cases, using your heel) to blip the throttle (which raises the engine RPMs) to match the speed of the wheels in the lower gear. While your right foot is doing the above, your left foot (at an appropriate point in the braking zone) is pushing in the clutch, your right hand has taken the car out of gear, paused in neutral while your blipping the throttle and when the engine RPMs have reached the appropriate level you move into the lower gear and release the clutch.

Some drivers let the clutch out after moving into neutral and then push it in again to move into the lower gear, hence the term "double-clutch." There is no reference here to "appropriate level"; while each gear certainly does have its own appropriate RPM range, depending on which lower gear you're changing to, most drivers are not watching their tachometers at this time but are relying on sound and feel.

That is why this technique is employed by more advanced drivers; it takes a certain amount of seat time in order to develop the sense of when to release the clutch just by the sound of the engine and feel of the car. This is a technique that is better practiced in a large parking lot or quiet back road until it feels natural before attempting it on the track.

Smoothness
How many times have you heard an instructor talk about being smooth? Frequently! Smoothness is attained by keeping the car well-balanced at all times. What does that mean? Optimally, it means having the car's weight equally distributed on all four wheels. If the car's weight is evenly distributed on all four wheels, it means you will be able to maximize the traction (or adhesion) of all four tires. And, the more rubber you have in contact with the road, the better you are able to control the car, not to mention the faster you will be able to go. One of the first upgrades new DE students make is to exchange their street tires for softer compound tires. These tires have less tread, softer compound rubber and, therefore, more tire is in contact with the road surface. This enables greater adhesion and hence more safety at speed.

Weight Transfer
Unless you are traveling in a straight line, and very rarely even then, is the car's weight evenly distributed on all four tires. The car's weight is constantly being shifted from side to side, frontwards and backwards and even up and down. Your goal as the driver is to manage these weight shifts or transfers which occur while braking, shifting, cornering and accelerating in order to take advantage of every bit of traction that is available. By the way, there is a limit as to the amount of traction your car has available. This is commonly defined through the conceptual use of the Friction Circle.

For all you engineers out there — trivia questions:

* In what year was the concept of the Friction Circle publicly introduced?
* Who introduced it?


Think of it in these terms: a tire cannot exceed 100% of any one function or combination of functions at any given time. If, for example, you use all the traction available (100%) to brake in a straight line, you will not have any percentage left over for turning. If you need to turn while braking, you have to reduce the percentage used for braking in order to have some left over for turning. 100% adhesion is not available in two directions at once!

Seeing an example of tire contact patches is a great way to show the effects of weight transfer on your car. In reality, a tire's contact patch is about the size of a standard postcard; this is the amount of rubber in contact with the road surface. These tire contact patches expand (when weight is over that wheel) or contract (when weight has been shifted away from that wheel).

When accelerating (in a straight line) weight transfers to the rear wheels, expanding the rear wheels tire contact patch but decreasing the front wheels tire contact patch. The reverse happens under braking. Add a corner and lateral weight transfer takes place. Turn to the right, and the weight shifts to the left; turn to the left, and the weight shifts to the right.

Assuming you have just finished braking or lifting, during the entrance to a right hand turn, the largest tire contact patch is at the left front tire with the left rear tire patch being almost as large.

String Theory
Imagine a string with one end attached to the bottom center of your steering wheel when it is in a neutral (straight) position and the other secured to your accelerator in the depressed position. When you turn your wheel, it forces the accelerator to ease up. As the wheel straightens out, you are able to fully depress the accelerator. There is a balance between accelerating and turning. that adds up to the 100% discussed above under weight transfer.

Similarly, imagine the string attached to the brake pedal instead. The same principle applies. In short, you cannot turn the wheel without giving up some acceleration or braking power.

Threshold Braking
This is the practice of braking at the limit of tire adhesion while still keeping control of the car and not locking up the wheels. Start by very gradually braking later and later as you approach a corner. This allows you to learn what your particular tires' adhesion limits are without adding the effects of lateral weight transfer. As you gain more experience you will want to try trail-braking.

Trail-braking
This is the practice of braking and cornering at the same time. As a beginning student, however, you are taught to brake in a straight line. Trail-braking allows you to maintain your straightaway speed longer before having to brake for a corner because you can corner and brake simultaneously. You still begin your major braking on the approach to a corner which means that you have transferred weight to the two front tires and enlarging your front contact patches.

To maintain that extra adhesion in order to give yourself added steering capability, you continue to brake, but not as hard as you did at the beginning. This frees up some of that 100% of your tire, allowing you to apply the remainder of the 100% to your steering. Just as you apex, you can "unwind" the steering wheel for the exit, thus straightening out your tires and lessening the need to steer. You have also freed up some of that 100% that you can now apply to the throttle. The straighter the wheel, the more throttle you may apply which transfers more weight to the rear wheels. It is this greater adhesion in the rear that is needed for accelerating out of the corner.

Trailing Throttle Oversteer
We have explained oversteer as a situation where the rear wheels lose traction in a corner. The rear wheels can lose traction in a corner if you lift off the accelerator, transferring weight to the front tires and off of the rear ones. Therefore, the rear of the car becomes light and because of the cornering forces the rear end swings to the outside of the corner.

Experienced drivers in certain situations will actually induce oversteer, maybe not by lifting entirely off the accelerator but by trailing or by slightly coming off the gas enough to swing the rear of the car around the corner.

Depending on the type of corner in which this technique is used, it may be the fastest way through the corner, as long as you remember smoothness. The weight transfer that is constantly taking place during the transition between braking and accelerating increases the need for smoothness. Abrupt changes in weight transfer will upset the balance of the car and you may end up without traction when you need it the most! That is why smoothness is emphasized so strongly at Driver Education Events.
For those I have coached and instructed
Remember
VISION, SMOOTHNESS, LINE AND FOCUS!
HAVE FUN BE SAFE
Roketman
 
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fjpikul

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Spartan, how did your car end up in the PRI magazine?
 

spartan

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Spartan, how did your car end up in the PRI magazine?
They did a photo shoot of my garage at M1 for their roadshow and included the new GT and my Mustang GT4.
 

Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
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I’ll bring a summons with me just in case.
Good one Frank. I believe I have a couple stick on shields which say "Student Driver". I'll see if I have room to pack them....
 

Indy GT

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Thought I’d share this old post I made some years back. Hope this is helpful
Wish I could be there! Hopefully in 2022!

Objectives for Beginning DE Participants

VISION, SMOOTHNESS, LINE AND FOCUS!
HAVE FUN BE SAFE
Uh Ron, back in early July, I asked you to review your archives for the "Objectives for Beginning DE Participants". You said you would try to find it. On July 26, 2021 you sent me the following PM indicating you could not find the treatise.

I’m trying to do a search on the forum with no luck
Perhaps DBK can find it.
I went back into the archives and found the article and posted it. Did you read Post #1?
Do we really need this lengthy advice posted twice???
 

roketman

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Uh Ron, back in early July, I asked you to review your archives for the "Objectives for Beginning DE Participants". You said you would try to find it. On July 26, 2021 you sent me the following PM indicating you could not find the treatise.



I went back into the archives and found the article and posted it. Did you read Post #1?
Do we really need this lengthy advice posted twice???
Bill forgive me I didn’t see that first post so you can delete mine or ignore it.
I did happen to find it so I posted it only with the best of intentions.
I was just trying to help.
Wish you the best of fun and success on the track event I’m sure it and you will great!
I shall really miss not being at the rally
Hopefully see you in 2022
My best regards
Ron
AKA Roketman
 

SYCO GT

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I came from working in the motorcycle safety industry, so my automotive helmet knowledge might not be as on point, but I wanted to share some notes, as you search for a new helmet or look at your existing equipment fitment. There are so many options out there it can be daunting.

I'm currently on my second Arai GP-5W automotive helmet, as helmets should be replaced periodically to keep within current approved technology, and like tires, they do degrade over time, even if not used extensively, or worn out completely. Previously, I had a Bell Helmet for automotive, but although a great value and decent choice, I found it heavier than I would prefer.

Since I prefer a helmet without a visor in a closed cockpit car, I converted the GP-5W to a tinted visor (for shade) instead of a clear or tinted full face shield. Coming from motorcycles, I don't mind the chin bar, but others may have a preference to a 3/4 helmet which can make visibility full and installing temporary communication faster and easier. Again, personal preference, just know there are options.

Finally, know how to measure your head and assess a good fit. Many helmets will allow pads of different thicknesses. For example, the GP-5W comes with 25mm cheekpads, but I tend to prefer a smaller cheekpad, either 15mm or 12mm in thickness. As with many things, dealer stock can be limited, but anything that corporate Arai (based in PA) does have in stock, can typically be sent via USPS Priority or other methods of your choosing. The cheek pads are easily removed and replaced by hand, as they have tabs on both ends that will hold them in place.

Hope that helps! Other considerations might be HANS compatibility or other amenities depending on your motorsport activities.

Arai Pads-0003911.jpgArai Pads-0003918.jpg
 

BM SoCal

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Helmet question, how do taller people fit without a Gurney bubble? I fit very well without a helmet but with it, not so much. Reclined my seat til it hit the window, not enough. Moved seat forward and tilted more but that’s not so good either.

Any ideas?
 

roketman

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Slide the seat a bit forward and recline the the back.be sure to Adjust the seat with out your helmet on,than Put your helmet before you get in .
 
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jaxgt

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Helmet question, how do taller people fit without a Gurney bubble? I fit very well without a helmet but with it, not so much. Reclined my seat til it hit the window, not enough. Moved seat forward and tilted more but that’s not so good either.

Any ideas?
After the rally, a good upholsterer can lower your seat bottom by changing the padding - many have done it - adds about 1.5-2" extra headroom.
 
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twobjshelbys

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Jul 26, 2010
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Helmet question, how do taller people fit without a Gurney bubble? I fit very well without a helmet but with it, not so much. Reclined my seat til it hit the window, not enough. Moved seat forward and tilted more but that’s not so good either.

Any ideas?
What kind of helmet do you have? Some are not as "tall". I don't recall which I had, Bell I think, and it was a definite difference.
 

BM SoCal

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What kind of helmet do you have? Some are not as "tall". I don't recall which I had, Bell I think, and it was a definite difference.
I picked up a Bell, other helmets I tried were too tight on my head. Fit on this felt great but I couldn’t test fit in my car. Or rather didn’t think of that.
 

SYCO GT

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I feel like I have to cant my head slightly in the '06 GT with a helmet on. Yikes, I haven't even sat in a NFGT yet with a helmet on, I guess I'll try it tonight and see if it's more or less spacious.
 

BM SoCal

GT Owner
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I feel like I have to cant my head slightly in the '06 GT with a helmet on. Yikes, I haven't even sat in a NFGT yet with a helmet on, I guess I'll try it tonight and see if it's more or less spacious.
Ha yes give it a try, I was surprised because I fit so easily without it. I suppose I can endure 20 min one way or the other even if it’s funky.
 

twobjshelbys

GT Owner
Jul 26, 2010
5,515
Las Vegas, NV
I picked up a Bell, other helmets I tried were too tight on my head. Fit on this felt great but I couldn’t test fit in my car. Or rather didn’t think of that.
I bought mine from a store in Phoenix before I went to a Bondurant school so I could swap it if needed. The guy that I talked to also recommended the open face helmet as they were "shorter". I still had to tilt the seat back to keep from rubbing on the head liner.
 
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BM SoCal

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jan 2, 2009
232
Orange County, CA
I probably should have got an open face… Well it’s just a few hours!
 

roketman

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Oct 24, 2005
7,390
ma.
I’m a big fan of the Stilo Carbon fiber rally helmet DE7C0E9F-EEFD-4490-9421-8C255C67537F.jpegDE7C0E9F-EEFD-4490-9421-8C255C67537F.jpeg
 

PeteK

GT Owner
Apr 18, 2014
1,624
Kalama, Free part of WA State
Too bad you have to throw it away every 10 years!