The Future of the Internal Combustion Engine


RALPHIE

GT Owner
Mar 1, 2007
7,279
How the valves work doesn't matter for a car never leaves the garage.
:lol

Great find though...the new ideas being investigated are amazing to me, who saw so little engineering improvements during the gas crises of the 70's.
 
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BlackICE

GT Owner
Nov 2, 2005
1,412
SF Bay Area in California
:lol

Great find though...the new ideas being investigated are amazing to me, who saw so little engineering improvements during the gas crises of the 70's.
This is only possible now because of low cost computer chips to control them, in the mid to late 70s you had only 8080 and Z80, 6502, 6800... that would need a lot of custom circuits to control valves. I doubt even if made, it would be cheap or robust enough for autos.

The mechanical techology isn't so new IMO.
 
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598

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Feb 19, 2007
207
Frankfort Ill
I think there is a diesel shop out of Colorado that has been working on this tech for several years. I'm curious where the OEM's are on this.

Steve
 

BlackICE

GT Owner
Nov 2, 2005
1,412
SF Bay Area in California
I'm curious where the OEM's are on this.

Steve
Waiting for the patents to expire.
 
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Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,404
Greenwood, IN
Quite interesting!

The moderator did not show or discuss fuel introduction to the cylinder so I assume the electronic valving could be used by fuel injection upstream of the inlet valve (pretty typical in today's engines) or direct injection which is just starting to see application.

I would also summarize his anticipated +30% gain in power would be due to increases in volumetric efficiency by opening the valve as a square wave function (as he showed on the o-scope) as opposed to ramp-up, ramp-down which is necessary for a follower on a cam lobe. It is unclear how getting more air into the cylinder for combusion (increased volumetric efficiency) makes for lower emissions which is more controlled (IMO) by turbulance or the completeness of the combusion process.

None the less, an interesting advance in technology....
 

BlackICE

GT Owner
Nov 2, 2005
1,412
SF Bay Area in California
By having variable duration valve timing with fast ramp up and ramp down slopes you can better optimize the airflow to enhance mixture of fuel and air under a wider range of conditions than currently done.
 
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Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,404
Greenwood, IN
Cool...
Thanks Ice!
 

BlackICE

GT Owner
Nov 2, 2005
1,412
SF Bay Area in California
The challenge is get this reliable enough for mass produced cars at a low enough price point to make it cost effective. When we see it win at 24 hrs Le Mans will be the start of getting into the common car.

I don't think it is trivial to get a pneumatic actuator to last 100,000 miles in an engine without maintenance. Going under the valve covers every 10K miles for a Ferrari like service $$$ is counter to the desires of the consumer market
 

DBK

The Favor Factory™
Staff member
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jul 30, 2005
14,747
Metro Detroit
They were discussing this on my local car forum and someone made the following point:

"This tech is pretty cool, and has some great potential benefits, but once the electrially driven actuators are viable for large scale production it will be overshadowed extremely quickly. According to the video, the air system is capable of only altering timing, it will still have a fixed open and close ramp, and lift. The electric systems that I've seen running with my own eyes are capable of infinitely variable adjustments of timing, lift, and ramps. "
 

RALPHIE

GT Owner
Mar 1, 2007
7,279
Guess I'm old school -

http://www.wimp.com/tiniestengine/
 

Indy GT

Yea, I got one...too
Mark IV Lifetime
Jan 14, 2006
2,404
Greenwood, IN
Interesting Ralph.
Did not see him put piston rings on during the assembly.
And the harmonic damper is huge for the size of the engine. Likely due to the method of making the crankshaft.
 

Luke Warmwater

Permanent Vacation
Jul 29, 2009
1,414
Boondocks, Colorado
That is cool and I followed a few other links to some other miniatures. Neat stuff. I have to ask though, if you are old school then why aren't you driving a real GT40 and not that modern replica ha?
 

2112

Blue/white 06'
Mark II Lifetime
Interesting Ralph.
Did not see him put piston rings on during the assembly.
And the harmonic damper is huge for the size of the engine. Likely due to the method of making the crankshaft.
Agreed, beautiful art but once it hits any RPM, that little jewel is going to fly apart in a million pieces.

Talented lathe operator. Thanks Ralphie, I forwarded it on to all my Gearhead buddies.
 

RALPHIE

GT Owner
Mar 1, 2007
7,279
That is cool and I followed a few other links to some other miniatures. Neat stuff. I have to ask though, if you are old school then why aren't you driving a real GT40 and not that modern replica ha?
I would if I could. But I'm not into replica cars. I'd want the real thing, and they are a bit beyond my budget, damn it! If I had one, you'd see it on the track!

or maybe a Tipo 61 Maserati Birdcage, Lotus 19, Porsche RSK, McLaren M6B - - - the cars I worked on when they were racing, but I was too young to afford. Yet, I've got some great memories, as a few of you know. :thumbsup

Yet, I'd never sell my GT - it's a dream car of its own. If I can't have an original Ford GT40, then I'll settle for a FORD GT.
 
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RALPHIE

GT Owner
Mar 1, 2007
7,279
Agreed, beautiful art but once it hits any RPM, that little jewel is going to fly apart in a million pieces.

Talented lathe operator. Thanks Ralphie, I forwarded it on to all my Gearhead buddies.
Remember - it's a diesel, which only turn 2,000 rpm or so.
 

jcthorne

GT Owner
Aug 30, 2011
792
Houston
Ford was working on camless engines for some time now using high pressure oil and electrical control based loosely on the technology used in the powerstroke diesel for high pressure direct fuel injection. Had not heard much about the tech in some time though, seems Ecoboost and its use of EGR to control flame propogation has overshadowed a bit recently. Also with the dual VCT tech already in production, the additional benefits may not warrant the additional cost.
 

Luke Warmwater

Permanent Vacation
Jul 29, 2009
1,414
Boondocks, Colorado
I still believe all electric is coming in our lifetime but this is neat stuff.

[video=youtube;Bch5B23_pu0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bch5B23_pu0[/video]
 

Empty Pockets

ex-GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Oct 18, 2006
1,267
Washington State
Holy crow!

Even a non-techy like me can see the endless possibilities that setup can provide.
 

BlackICE

GT Owner
Nov 2, 2005
1,412
SF Bay Area in California
Holy crow!

Even a non-techy like me can see the endless possibilities that setup can provide.
How the valves work doesn't matter for a car never leaves the garage.
 
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Cobrar

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Jun 24, 2006
3,900
Metro Detroit
Pneumatic valve actuation is not new, at least to Ford. It was used in F1 racing from 1989-1993 in the form of the Ford/Cosworth HB. It is an early design, as such it is not 'camless' as it still uses DOHC architecture.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/arvosadventures/5312251970/

And it was a competitive design.

http://books.google.com/books?id=RM7SsgyNqYQC&pg=PA283&lpg=PA283&dq=ford+benetton+cosworth+hb+pneumatic+valves&source=bl&ots=QRZXHfFvnz&sig=GA-uknMLG3iJwANRdgQ5_ejFPqU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=h-srUbv7FoLDyAGJooHIAg&ved=0CD0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=ford benetton cosworth hb pneumatic valves&f=false

Ford currently has a VP of engineering, Hau Tai Tang, who was assigned to the Ford Indy (XB derivative) teams during the 1991-93 program. He is a motorsports kind of guy, might be fun to invite him to a Rally to talk about XB, Indy and whatever he might know about the HB engine program.