Storing my 2006 GT


RPM217

2005 white/blue stripe
Jun 18, 2010
1,509
Rye Brook, New York
I no longer subscribe to the idea that you need to start the car and move it on the tires concept.
First, if you start the car and not bring all the fluids to temp, then you just risk more condensation (water) in your lubricants.
There is also the argument of frictional damage every time that you start the engine "dry".
Secondly, the tire technology has improved SO much over the years that I don't think that flat spotting is an issue any longer.
Of course, that all depends on the duration of storage and the surface stored upon.
I don't suggest that any car be stored for "long periods of time" on bare concrete.
We had the same issues shooting our precision rifles.
Turns out that "over cleaning" the barrels did more harm then good.
Only my opinion.
Best,
Mark
Agree with Mark, what I do is overinflate the tires to avoid flatspotting, haven't had any problems!!
 

MAD IN NC

Proud Owner/ BOD blah bla
Mark IV Lifetime
Feb 14, 2006
4,193
North Carolina
where I live, no matter what I'll find a way to stretch the cars legs withing 2 months... sometimes its a short window but never had any issues.....
 

Specracer

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Nov 28, 2005
6,470
MA
I too agree with walk away, and leave it (not starting it "every month"), because of the moisture created. Flat spots work out after just a few miles.
 

dr914

GT Owner
Feb 11, 2009
179
Marietta Georgia
I also agree, but have it stored in a dehumidified and climate controlled garage with gas stabilizer in the fuel. I also overinflate the tires, and on my older cars remove that battery and keep it on a battery tender. I would assume that you can remove the battery on the Ford (I drive my car once a month so keep it in the car on the factory battery tender) which is certainly advisable. The main thing though is the climate control and dehumidification.
 

GDC

New member
Mar 11, 2019
2
I have a 2006 Ford with just about 1,000 miles. The car has been sitting covered in my garage for 3 - 4 years without being started or driven. A local dealer is recommending that I drain and flush the fuel and oil systems, a transmission service and retorqueing the Half-Shafts. Are these items necessary and is there anything else I should do? Appreciate any feedback.
 

twobjshelbys

GT Owner
Jul 26, 2010
5,332
Las Vegas, NV
... and on my older cars remove that battery and keep it on a battery tender. I would assume that you can remove the battery on the Ford (I drive my car once a month so keep it in the car on the factory battery tender) which is certainly advisable. ...
Note that if you are storing it but intend on licensing it, and you live in a state that uses OBDII for emissions certification, then removing the battery will clear all of the OBDII "system readiness indicators" and you'll have to do the full drive cycle to get them cleared to pass emissions. Similarly changing the battery can (unless you install the battery tender first) clear them out. If you install the tender it has enough power to hold the memory over the change.
 

fjpikul

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jan 4, 2006
10,356
Belleville, IL
Make sure your battery is in good shape. You could burn out gauges if not. May be worthwhile not taking a chance and replace it first. The fuel filter is somewhat difficult to replace. Were the half-shaft bolts replaced previously? If not, retorqueing them will not help. If they were replaced, they shouldn't need any service. Cycle ac and check level. Replace brake and clutch fluids. Tires probably flat spotted. Take out trunk liner make sure there is no rodent damage.
 

GDC

New member
Mar 11, 2019
2
Thanks for your reply. I did replace the battery today. The half-shafts have not been touched since buying the car but have not had any issues.
 

junior

GT Owner
Mar 9, 2007
1,121
So Cal
1/2 shafts will require changing at some point to the upgraded ones (it's a when and not if they fail issue), Engine will require priming after the oil/filter change (plenty of info on "how to" on this forum). I suggest to reach out to team Kendall and Ryan, Cool Tech LLC, forum name "Not4re", they know the FGT extremely well and the service and attention to details are second to none.
 
Last edited:

Johntpr

GT Owner
Jan 18, 2017
172
Rockland County, NY
Add : Replace all the coolant. Consider changing all the belts, especially the oil pump belt.
 

Art138

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Jan 4, 2011
397
Weston,FL
The negative ground battery cable attach point might need some filing to ensure good contact.
 
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MK2_GT

GTX1 Owner
Mar 25, 2006
792
Be careful with tires if they are older than 5 years. Replace them no matter what shape they are in .
 
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MTV8

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Jul 24, 2010
914
Houston Texas
Certainly nothing wrong with frequent oil changes, but there should be no need for one in this case.
 

Joehand1

Tungsten GT Owner
Sep 20, 2007
592
Hattiesburg, MS, USA
Not good to sit unranked so long, rubber seals especially in the AC compressor start to leak. You should crank it and idle for at least until the oil gets hot every other week.
 

Bill Briley

GT Owner
Aug 9, 2005
212
Valley Forge PA.
What is the procedure for purging the fuel tank ?
After four years of sitting - will the fuel still be good?
 

TO AWSUM

Ford GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Jul 4, 2007
1,382
Niceville FL
GDC, Based on your previous comment, it doesn't appear than you have accomplished any of the recalls nor followed the maintenance recommendations in the owners manual.

The following recalls should have been accomplished over 10 years ago:
Replace faulty half-shaft bolts as they WILL BREAK
Replace driver and passenger air bags as the originals have killed people during use.
Replace A-arms if manufactured in the 1st 6-months of 2005 which yours was not, so you're good.

The following maintenance should have been accomplished, especially for low mileage cars:
Replace oil pump belt every 5 years, especially if the engine isn't started regularly as belt will dry rot
Replace tires every 10 years or less as they will blow out on you, manufacturers recommend 7 years.
Replace fluids after 1st 1000 miles, then every 5000 miles (engine, clutch and transmission)
Coolant needs to be vacuumed to empty the old fluid to eliminate air pockets and future overheating.
Possibly replace Supercharger oil
Check your shocks as they are known to leak
You already replaced the battery so it is good
The front and rear hood struts (4) are probably faulty and will not hold the 2 hoods up.
The rear hood latch springs (2) may be deteriorated and need to be replaced/repaired with rubber grommets.
Ethanol fuel might last a year or 2, but may be bad after 6 months. If the tank is low on fuel, you can usually add fresh fuel to dilute it and be OK. If the tank is full so you can't dilute it with fresh gas, I would drain a full tank after 2 years. Probably easiest to syphon it out with a long hose.
Check air-conditioning fluid as they are known to leak down. Don't just top it off. Vacuum it down and then weigh for the correct amount to add.
 
Oct 14, 2009
202
Alberta, Canada
What is the procedure for purging the fuel tank ?
After four years of sitting - will the fuel still be good?
Yeah....no......the fuel will not be good after four years. I started my 68 GT500 this spring with 2 year old fuel and it was like a Chinese coal fired factory exploding in my garage. Big.......black.......toxic cloud.

Drain out that old fuel.

QSS
 

roketman

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Oct 24, 2005
6,813
ma.
I would bring it to an experienced Ford Gt shop.Depending where you are located forum members can recommend an appropriate shop
 

Bill Briley

GT Owner
Aug 9, 2005
212
Valley Forge PA.
Good advice - Thanks
 

mmlcobra

GT Owner
May 25, 2013
1,051
I no longer subscribe to the idea that you need to start the car and move it on the tires concept.
First, if you start the car and not bring all the fluids to temp, then you just risk more condensation (water) in your lubricants.
There is also the argument of frictional damage every time that you start the engine "dry".
Secondly, the tire technology has improved SO much over the years that I don't think that flat spotting is an issue any longer.
Of course, that all depends on the duration of storage and the surface stored upon.
I don't suggest that any car be stored for "long periods of time" on bare concrete.
We had the same issues shooting our precision rifles.
Turns out that "over cleaning" the barrels did more harm then good.
Only my opinion.
Best,
Mark