Recommended storage procedure 2022 Ford GT


RLB - 06

New member
Aug 12, 2019
1
My car is located in the Midwest, Chicago area, and am wondering about the "pros and cons" for winter storage.
The car will be stored in a climate controlled facility, clean and covered. I have read the Vehicle Care section of the owners manual, couple of questions:
- I store some of my other cars on jack stands located on the jacking points - better or worse than on the ground as recommended? I can still start the car on the stands, but obviously not drive/roll it around so that the suspension is activated.
- "Make sure the brakes and parking brake release fully" How do you keep the parking brake form activating on engine shut down??
- Any other recommendations?
Thanks
 
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Specracer

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Nov 28, 2005
7,088
MA
Im in New England and the car sits for the winter. I do not believe in some of the "winter rituals", especially starting the car and letting it "warm up". I feel that even when left running for a while, the car never truly warms up, and moisture created never really dries up.

Our car, parks for the last time in October, or November, and is put on a battery tender, and left for the duration. As for the e-brake, it is electric, and there is a sequence in the service manual as to how to disengage it when not running,, but I do not do that for winter. I would not put it on jack stands, but that my opinion. As for the thought process of eliminating flat spotted tires? I have found that if they do, they work their way out after a few miles of driving.

You are addressing the most important thing for winter storage (to me), and that is a dry storage facility. Humidity / and worse any condensation, makes a mess of cars quickly.

Your 1st post, after being here for 4 years, welcome to the forum.
 

fjpikul

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jan 4, 2006
11,490
Belleville, IL
If they flat spot, better to run the car when it is hot outside (ambient temp above 80 degrees F). I usually inflate them to around 40 psi for the winter in St Louis.
 

w.a.nelson

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Feb 29, 2008
1,099
Asbury, NJ and Bourne, MA
Winter? We don't need no stinkin' Winter!

Make sure you take mouse countermeasures.
 

AJB

GT
Mark II Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jun 28, 2006
2,944
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Fill fuel tank , add gasoline stabilizer, inflate tires to 40 psi and just let vehicle rest on the ground ( jack stands put the suspension in full rebound and tend to compress the rebound stops unnaturally over time), clean & wax , connect battery tender,
…And just let it rest ( no occasional starting of the engine —that generates condensation per Andy’s note above ,
Andy (ajb )
 
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Mule Air

Active member
Jan 28, 2019
33
Raleigh, NC
Global Warming is awesome in the winter.
 

GT@50

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Dec 14, 2019
861
Issaquah
Recommended? Drop it off at my house. I'll keep the tires rotated and fresh fuel in it for you.
 

Gene Cassone

GT Owner
Mark II Lifetime
Dec 3, 2005
1,002
way upstate NY
I agrée with above for other cars, not starting during winter since engine wear occurs in each startup until oil pressure up (not as of a problem in 05-06 with ability to crank engine over but not starting until oil pressure is up!)
Not sure about the moisture issue since humide low during winter in cold climates especially if heated.
However more worried about NFGT’s complicated hydraulics!! Seals drying out etc. I try to run the car monthly, raising and lowering the vehicle . Unfortunately cannot excercize all the systems, but at least « pressurizing » them?! Thoughts on this!?
 

Ed Sims

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Apr 7, 2006
7,851
NorCal
1526449_645676048808091_1691583960_n.jpeg
 

KennethClay

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Oct 15, 2012
861
New York
Savage. But true, unfortunately. Fall in the northeast is spectacular. Unfortunately, winter follows that...
 

fjpikul

GT Owner
Mark IV Lifetime
Le Mans 2010 Supporter
Jan 4, 2006
11,490
Belleville, IL
Don't forget to leave wing up.
 
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RaceDeck

*Supporting Vendor & GT Owner*
Supporting Vendor
Aug 11, 2005
267
SLC Utah
I have been using VP C9 - it's ethanol-free. As a result, it is an excellent long-term storage fuel. Also safe for catalytic converters or oxygen sensors. As long as its in the barrel or in your tank sealed, it will last well over a year with zero issue. I have been using for over 3 years now and in cars and motorcycles and all my fuel issues are gone.
 
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